LIVING CULTURE PROGRAM

What is Living Culture

Cultural Infusion’s Living Culture program works to preserve cultural diversity in impoverished communities in Africa and Asia. We recognise that community cultural practices imbue members with a sense of identity and belonging. Our Living Culture program connects local culture bearers with young people in their community who may in turn become teachers of local culture.

We run these programs in close consultation with the local community groups as well as local and national government authorities.

In 2017 Cultural Infusion launched Living Culture programs at our centres in Pakistan and Tanzania. The program aims to raise awareness of local cultural practices that are at risk of dying out.

Each and every unique culture is valuable to us all.

We work through our local coordinators to focus our efforts in the following areas:

Learners

Young people between 7 and 25 who will be trained

Apprentices

Talented participants with potential to be leaders/teachers in their community who receive one-to-one training

Local Cultural Development Coordinator

Recruits and monitors Culture Bearers, monitors participants and leaders, advises on local needs.

Culture Bearers

These are the master artists who regularly train students, apprentices and arrange weekly performances.

Community Partners

Local organizations who support the program and provide access to valuable information, resources and networks.

Local and National Government

Monitor the project and advise on National Legislation and priorities.

Where are our programs

Zanzibar is an Island off the coast of East Africa. Zanzibar has a longstanding tradition as a rich locus of culture influenced by the Doe, Zaramo, Kwele, Makonde and Mwera people of Africa, and visitors from India, Asia, Europe and Arabia.

Dance, Singing & Drums
Jambiani, Zanzibar, Tanzania

In Tanzanian culture, dance and drumming feature in a variety of events such as wedding ceremonies, crop harvest, religious celebrations and healing practices. The bearers of this art form teach drumming styles such as Kibungo, Kidumbaki, Kiungi, Mahumbwa and Dandalo to youths aged 7 to 25. The dances and songs are from the tribes of Malivata, Amoni, Ngokwa and Masewe, Participants in turn will be inspired to impart these traditions to the next generation.

Drumming
Zanzibar, Tanzania

In Tanzanian culture, drumming features heavily in a variety of events such as wedding ceremonies, crop harvest, religious celebrations and healing practices. The bearers of this art form teach drumming styles such as Kibungo, Kidumbaki, Kiungi, Mahumbwa and Dandalo to youths of both genders aged 15 to 25.